DISCOVER INDIA’S BREATH-TAKING SHOOTING LOCALES

admin   May 18, 2022

India, land of beautiful locales and great talents, has reopened its doors for filming in India for global producers and studios. Film Facilitation Office (FFO), set up by the Ministry of Information & Broadcasting in the National Film Development Corporation (NFDC), is currently accepting online applications for foreign producers to shoot in India

There are few countries that can compete with India’s geographical and cultural diversity when it comes to filming in India. From the lofty snow-capped peaks of the Himalayas to the sand dunes of Rajasthan’s Thar Desert in North India and the sandy beaches of Goa in the south, one can easily replicate the backdrops of Mandarin China in Kolkata’s downtown, Afghanistan in the rugged mountains of Ladakh, Jamaica in feisty Goa, and Arabian nights in Jodhpur.

India is the world’s largest film producer, producing approximately 2,000 films per year. Its sheer size and the number of films released each year have caused the world to take notice of Indian cinema. It is now well established that a compelling story with universal themes has the ability to transcend borders. Indian films are made in a variety of locations throughout the country, and each of these filmmaking cities serves as a cinematic hub for one major language.

Mumbai, India’s film capital, is home to the Hindi film industry. Marathi-language films are also produced in the city, which is inextricably linked to Indian cinema history (along with neighbouring Pune). Chennai, Kolkata, Hyderabad, Thiruvananthapuram, Bangalore, Bhubaneswar, Guwahati, Patna, and Delhi NCR are other major Indian film production cities.

The Indian AVGC story is reaching a crescendo as international studios expand their presence in India, making it a hub for virtual production, post-production, visual effects, and graphics, and as storytellers weave intricate narratives with universal appeal.

India also has world-class production and post-production facilities, as well as skilled labour, and when these benefits are combined with a transparent and responsive government-backed system for obtaining various shooting permits, it has the potential to greatly enhance the beauty of filming in India.

As the world’s largest filmmaking country emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic, it intends to focus on making it easier for international filmmakers to explore this beautiful country while also utilising low-cost and highly skilled film production professionals to add global appeal to their stories.

As a result of some serious efforts put in by FFO, as many as 138 international projects (Feature Films, TV/Web shows and series) from across 33 countries have been accorded permissions to film in India. Out of these, 13 projects were granted official coproduction status by the Ministry of I&B.


Featured Post

Film Making Centres of India

admin   September 14, 2020

India is probably the world’s most culturally and linguistically diverse nation. Its people speak 22 different languages, besides hundreds of dialects. No wonder then that India is a land of many cinematic traditions. The 1800-odd movies that the country annually produces are made in a number of languages, each with its own distinct literature, history, theatre and music.

Indian films are produced in several centres around the country. Each of these filmmaking cities serves as the hub of cinema in one prominent language.

Mumbai, regarded as India’s movie capital, hosts the Hindi film industry that has a pan-Indian footprint. Marathi-language films are also produced in the city (besides neighbouring Pune) that is inextricably intertwined with the history of Indian cinema.

Chennai, Kolkata, Hyderabad, Thiruvananthapuram, Bangalore, Bhubaneswar and Guwahati are the other major Indian cities where films are produced.

While the distribution of these so-called ‘regional’ films is largely limited within the territories for which they are made – they do not have the nationwide reach of Bollywood blockbusters – they add immensely to the depth and range of Indian cinema.

MUMBAI, Maharashtra

The centre-point of Indian film industry, Mumbai, popularly Bollywood, is a land of cinema. From commercial grandeur to arthouse movies, there is no short of cinema in the capital city of Maharashtra

The bustling western Indian metropolis is the heart of the Indian movie industry, producing nearly 200 films a year in the Hindi language. It also, along with the nearby city of Pune, produces Marathi-language films, which, in the silent era and beyond, thrived in the hands of pioneering stalwarts like V Shantaram and Bhalji Pendharkar, among others. A large chunk of the Hindi films produced in Mumbai constitute what is usually described as Bollywood, a label used for an old cinematic tradition built on a formulaic and crowd-pleasing mix of melodrama, romance, moral conflict and music. This extravagant form of storytelling is extremely popular in the other filmmaking centres as well. However, it is by no means the only kind of cinema that emerges from Mumbai.

The city has always had two distinct streams of filmmaking – one aimed at providing glitzy and emotionally satisfying entertainment to the masses; the other designed to appeal to a niche audience with a taste for more realistic movies. There have of course been occasions when these two separate approaches have merged in the same film and resulted in timeless classics such as Mother India, Mughal-e-Azam, Deewar and Lagaan. The A-list Mumbai cinema stars, objects of adulation around the country and by the Indian Diaspora, power the mainstream Bollywood industry. Mumbai played a key role in the evolution of parallel films in the late 1960s and 1970s,thanks to the efforts of directors like Shyam Benegal and Govind Nihalani. Its filmmakers also drove the global spread of the Bollywood narrative idiom in the aftermath of major commercial successes in the past decade and a half. A breed of younger Mumbai filmmakers, migrants to the city from different parts of the country, have scripted a new kind of popular cinema that blends social awareness, aesthetic clarity and stylistic accessibility. Several of these films have travelled to international festivals in recent years while finding takers on the domestic distribution circuit as well.

CHENNAI

Located down south of India, Chennai is the birthplace of Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam and Kannada film industries. While the last three moved to their respective neighbouring states, Tamil movies continue to be made in this city, thus making it a sought after destination of movie making in the country

Chennai (formerly Madras) is home to the hugely successful and productive Tamil movie industry, which has, over the decades, given Indian cinema a few of its biggest and most abiding stars. The Tamil movie industry has seen film production since the mid 1910s. It has constantly kept pace with the growth of the rest of Indian cinema. In fact, at several junctures in its history, it even set the pace for others to follow, especially in matters of technology and film production practices. Tamil cinema has a following not only in the state of Tamil Nadu but also in the other southern states of India, besides among the Tamil expatriate community across the world. Hindi versions of Tamil box office hits as well as bilingual productions mounted in Chennai have been successful around India ever since 1948’s Chandralekha opened the sluice-gates for nationally distributed films from this part of India.

The dominant strain of Tamil movies, like that of Hindi popular cinema, hinges on the crowd-pulling power of its male superstars, notably veterans Rajinikanth and Kamal Haasan. A new generation of stars have continued the tradition. But in the past as well as in recent times, the industry has seen a steady output of films from young directors working outside the conventional star system with great success. For audiences around the country, Mani Ratnam, who also makes films in Hindi, is one of the better known Chennai directors.

KOLKATA

Kolkata has given the world some of the best movies and filmmakers. Right from the black and white era, Bengali films carried the stamp of reality and social awareness, and the flag still flies high.

Bengali-language cinema, known the world over for the celebrated masterpieces of Satyajit Ray, is produced in Kolkata from studios located largely in Tollygunge in the city’s southern suburbs.

Many of the pioneers of early Indian cinema worked in this city in the silent era. In fact, Hiralal Sen is known to have made films here well before India’s officially recognized first full-fledged fiction film, D.G. Phalke’s Raja Harishchandra, was screened in Mumbai. Commercial Bengali cinema has thrived right since the silent era, barring a few troughs in the 1980s and 1990s caused by the death of its most luminous superstar Uttam Kumar and the retirement of his on-screen partner Suchitra Sen.But it is for the critically acclaimed works of three masters – Ray, Ritwik Ghatak and Mrinal Sen – that Kolkata enjoys global fame. Directors such as Tapan Sinha and Tarun Majumdar built their careers around films that struck a fine balance between artistic merit and commercial potential.

More than their counterparts in any of the other film production centres of India, screenwriters and directors in Kolkata, especially those that work in the non-mainstream sphere, continue to draw inspiration primarily from literature. It is a tradition that dates back to the silent era, a period during which Bengali cinema, unlike other cinemas that were beginning to take roots in that period, produced social satires and dramas adapted from literary works rather than mythological epics.

HYDERABAD

Not just the land, but its films too are known for their spicy nature. It will be no exaggeration if we call Hyderabad the capital of commercial cinema. For, most of India’s colourful and costly movies are made here.

Hyderabad is the hub of Telugu cinema, which is one of the most prolific and commercially consistent of all the cinemas of India. Between Telengana and Andhra Pradesh, the two separate states that the erstwhile united Andhra Pradesh has recently been split into, there are 2800 movie halls, the highest in any single region of India. On several occasions in the last decade, Telugu films accounted for more releases in a year than cinema in any other Indian language, including Hindi. Many big-budget Hindi and Tamil films are official remakes of Telugu hits, a sure measure of the mass appeal of movies made in Hyderabad. In terms of artistic quality and global recognition, Telugu cinema may lag behind films made in Malayalam and Tamil, but it continues to be the most robust of the southern industries.Hyderabad has some of India’s best film production studios. They have been set up by established names of the Telugu movie industry – men such as B. N. Reddy, L.V. Prasad, Akkineni Nageswara Rao and D. Rama Naidu. Until about three decades ago, large sections of the Telugu movie industry operated out of Chennai. But today, Hyderabad is where all the Telugu cinema action is focused. Filmmmaker S.S. Rajamouli and male stars such as Prabhas enjoy nationwide popularity thanks mainly to the super success of the period action drama Baahubali.

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM

Known for producing award winning films, Thiruvananthapuram, the hub of Malayalam cinema, is lately carving a niche for itself for new-age content-rich and commercial movies. From Adoor Gopalakrishnan to Mohanlal-Mammootty to Vineeth-Nivin Pauly, the land has a rich legacy of cinema

Thiruvananthapuram (formerly Trivandrum) is the capital of the southern Indian state of Kerala. The city, along with Kochi, serves as the nerve-centre of cinema in Malayalam. Although films were made in the state in the silent era, cinema in Kerala was late to flourish and at the time of India’s Independence in 1947, only a handful of Malayalam filmshad been produced. But when the movie industry in this part of the country took off in the 1950s, it not only quickly caught up with the rest of Indian cinema, it also established itself at the forefront of the Indian parallel cinema movement. Malayalam movie superstars Mohanlal and Mammootty are known across the country and directors such as Adoor Gopalakrishnan and Shaji N. Karun and the late G. Aravindan are feted at film festivals around the world.

When Malayalam cinema began to assume the proportions of a full-fledged industry post-Independence, it was headquartered in Chennai. It was only by the late 1980s that it moved completely to its current location in Thiruvananthapuram. Like the other cinemas of India, Malayalam movies are divided between a popular genre and a socially relevant strand. Cinema from Kerala gained national and international prominence, riding on the films made by Adoor and Aravindan in the 1970s and 1980s. The tradition of making realistic and meaningful cinema continues to this day.

BENGALURU

The capital city of Karnataka is the home of Kannada film industry, popularly Sandalwood. It has produced some great talents, from actors to directors to technicians

In Bangalore, India’s Silicon Valley, films are made in the Kannada language. The first Kannada film was made in the talkie era, and the industry’s growth was steady until the late 1940s. The 1950s marked the advent of Dr.Rajkumar, whose popularity as a lead actor in mythological epics helped Kannada cinema achieve new heights. The 1970s and 1980s are generally regarded as the golden era of Kannada cinema, which was enriched by the work of directors like B.V.Karanth, Girish Karnad and Girish Kasaravalli. In 1970, Samskara, based on a novel by celebrated writer U.R. Ananthamurthy and directed by Pattabhi Rama Reddy, inaugurated the parallel cinema movement in Karnataka. While alternative cinema has continued to thrive in the state, commercial cinema, too, has sustained itself despite not quite enjoying the financial clout of Tamil and Telugu films.

LUCKNOW, Uttar Pradesh

Bhojpuri cinema, which also caters to third and fourth generation migrants in Surinam, Mauritius, Trinidad & Tobago, Fiji and Guyana, has its own star system and a committed audience base

The central Indian city of Lucknow is one of the bases of Bhojpuri cinema, which is produced largely in and for eastern Uttar Pradesh, western Bihar and Jharkhand. The first-ever Bhojpuri-language film, Ganga Maiyya Tohe Piyari Chadaibo (Mother Ganges, I Will Offer You a Yellow Sari), was released only in the early 1960s. But the industry grew steadily as the demand from people who speak the dialect in India and elsewhere increased. Bhojpuri cinema, which also caters to third and fourth generation migrants in Surinam, Mauritius, Trinidad & Tobago, Fiji and Guyana, has its own star system and a committed audience base, but it has failed to build on the opportunities to break into the national mainstream. The last couple of decades have seen a major spurt in the production of Bhojpuri films, but these have all been run-of-the-mill potboilers designed for an audience that seems to be undemanding and easy to please. In parts of India where Bhojpuri speakers live and work, these films continue to be exceedingly popular. But since most of these films are made on tight budgets and follow rushed production timelines, they tend to be rather low on technical finesse.

BHUBANESWAR

The shift of Odia cinema from Kolkata to Bhubaneswar heralded a new era. Since then, Bhubaneswar continues to be the focus point of Odia films

In the eastern Indian state of Odisha, films are made in Bhubaneswar and Cuttack.

The first Odia-language film was made in 1936, but until the 1950s only a handful of more titles were produced. Back then, the Odia film industry did not have production facilities of its own. Films in the language had to depend on Kolkata, which made movie-making in Odisha difficult and unviable.

In the late 1950s, the first cooperative venture to produce, distribute and exhibit Odia films was set up by Krushna Chandra Tripathy. The organization was named Utkal Chalachitra Pratisthan, and it produced several films in the 1960s that gave Odia cinema a distinct identity.

In 1961, another production house, Pancha Sakha, was set up by amateur artiste Dhira Biswal, who produced four hugely popular films. His first production, Nua Bou, created a sensation all across the state of Odisha.

Odia cinema developed its own idiom in subsequent years thanks to the efforts of the husband-wife team of Gour Prasad Ghosh and Parbati Ghosh. The duo produced several National Award-winning films, including the epochal Kaa.

Other production houses took roots in the 1970s, including Diamond Valley Productions, set up by entrepreneur Sarat Pujari.

In 1975, the state government stepped in to promote cinema by setting up the Odisha Film Development Corporation. Five years later, the Kalinga Studio came up with the support of Chennai’s Prasad Studios. Odisha currently produces an average of 20 films a year.

ASSAM

Despite heavy influence from Bollywood, Assamese cinema, being made from Guwahati, has carved a niche for itself and its presence in National Awards every year stands testimony to the claim

Assamese films, produced in north-eastern city of Guwahati, are a constant presence in India’s National Awards. Yet the film industry in Assam remains commercially unviable.

Constantly under the shadow of Bollywood films, the state has not been able to develop a distribution and exhibition system that can prop up locally made films and make them viable.

At the turn of the millennium, a ray of hope had emerged in the form of a spurt in Bollywood-inspired Assamese melodrama that found takers among the mass audience in the state. But the trend was short-lived.

Despite the effort of the pioneers and the work of their successors in the 1950s and 1960s (Bhupen Hazarika, Nip Barua, Pudum Barua), Assamese cinema has been dragged down by the paucity of exhibition outlets.

Despite all the odds, the names of the late author and filmmaker Bhabendra Nath Saikia and the still-active Jahnu Barua shine bright. In recent years, Rima Das, working largely out of her native village near Guwahati, has made massive waves globally with her films Village Rockstars and Bulbul Can Sing.

Filmmakers from the rest of Northeast India, notably Manipur and Meghalaya, are also increasingly making their presence felt on the national and international stage. Manipur’s Aribam Syam Sarma has for decades been a leading light of cinema from this region of India and his films have been lauded at festivals, including Cannes.


GES: Get, set, go

admin   August 31, 2019

The main objective of Global Exhibition on Services is to position India as a leader in the Service sector to the rest of the world, to tap potential for services’ exports and to draw further investment into India in the services sector.

India is set to host the fifth Global Exhibition on Services (GES) in Palace Ground, Bangalore from 26 to 28 November 2019.

Spearheaded by the Ministry of Commerce & Industry, Government of India, the expo is organised in association with the Confederation of India Industry (CII) and SEPC.

GES will bring the Indian M&E service providers under one platform to the expo. Content buyers, technology service providers, production and location executives will benefit.

The GES will enable delegates to explore M&E service solutions in the new emerging digital world.

GES will offer a one-stop-shop for meetings, networking and collaboration in the entertainment space.

The GES exhibition would be a meeting place for countries, for global service sector players to forge new business relationships and enhance international trade in services.

GES is the place to explore film shooting destinations across India.

It is a perfect launch pad for your products and services.

Interaction among international services sector players, day long seminars on M&E and dedicated B2B meetings to strike useful partnerships will be organised under the event. You can meet cost-effective post-production studios and service companies.

At GES, you have access to creative and business minds from all media and entertainment verticals/

Exhibit and engage with Indian M&E industry under one umbrella.

Check for more details in www.gesdelhi.in
email: pratik.mukherjee@cii.in


Commerce Ministry-CII-SEPC to Host 5th Global Exhibition on Services in Bangalore

admin   August 1, 2019

The Department of Commerce, Ministry of Commerce & Industry, Government of India, the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) and the Services Export Promotion Council (SEPC) will be jointly organizing the 5th edition of the Global Exhibition on Services from 26-28 November 2019 at the Palace Grounds, Bangalore.

“Shaping the Future of India & World” will be the theme of GES 2019.

In the global context, the importance of the services sector cannot be emphasized more. It contributes more to global output and employs more people than any other sector. Globally, services contribute almost one-third of world gross value added, half of world employment, one-fifth of global trade and more than half of the world foreign direct investment flows. The services sector has thus emerged as the most dynamic sector of the world economy,

GES is fast emerging as a definitive platform for the Services Sector worldwide.

The first Global Exhibition on Services (GES) was inaugurated by Hon’ble PM Shri Narendra Modi in 2015 at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi. At the inaugural session he emphasized that GES will bring India onto the world stage and urged the sector to become the key growth driver of India’s economic trajectory.

The second and third GES in 2016 and 2017 was inaugurated by Hon. President of India in Greater Noida, National Capital Region, India and President’s Estate respectively. Focus sectors at the event included IT & Telecom, Tourism, Media and Entertainment, Healthcare, Logistics, Professional Services, Education, R&D, Space and SME in Services.

As a part of GES, a large number of seminars / knowledge sessions are organized on diverse topics where expert industry leaders and government representatives deliberates on the various issues facing the services sectors. Many of these explored opportunities in specific geographies like Africa, Gulf region, Australia, and SAARC. Others focused on specific service sectors like Tourism and Culture, Exhibitions & Event Services, Banking & Financial Services, Media & Entertainment, Health & Medical Value Travel, MSMEs in services and on Education and Skills connecting India to the world. The GES in subsequent years scaled new heights in taking our services to the global market place and in showcasing the India Opportunity. As a dynamic player in the global services sector, India has the potential to build its own brand for services exports where it can be a dominant player and GES furthers the cause of:

Showcasing India’s prowess across services sectors before a global audience
Position India globally in more services sub-sectors Generate concrete business outcomes Create employment through leveraging services exports


Shooting Locales in India – Karnataka

admin   July 31, 2019

This state has the Silicon City of India and a whole array of health spas. A range of architecture depicted through its palaces, temples, mausoleums, monuments and ruins. Sanctuaries, national parks and waterfalls, along with endless beaches, scenic hills and modern cityscapes are abundant here

Incentives offered by Karnataka

  • A maximum of 125 qualitative films in Kannada and Karnataka’s regional languages, which have been completely produced in the State are eligible for the prescribed subsidy every year.

(i) A maximum of four children’s films including those which have won the State Government’s best children’s film awards are eligible for a special encouragement subsidy of Rs. 25 lakh each.

(ii) A maximum of four qualitative films based on historical and tourism promotional films are eligible for a special subsidy of Rs. 25 lakh each.

(iii) A maximum of five qualitative films completely based on best literary works are eligible for a special subsidy of Rs. 15 lakh each.

  • Under the new Karnataka Film Tourism Policy 2018 filmmakers are given incentives for promoting tourism, reflecting Karnataka’s culture and heritage among others:

(i) Films to be evaluated on a scale of 100 by a committee headed by the additional chief secretary.

(ii) On screen timing should be at least three minutes for songs and at least five minutes for movie sequence.

(iii) Film must showcase at least three out of 319 identified tourist destinations.

(iv) Films get an incentive of up to Rs. 2.5 crores that score 90 and above (Category A) while the films scoring 75-90 (Category B) get up to Rs. 1 crore.

Initiatives taken

  • Karnataka Animation Visual Effects, Gaming and Comics Policy (KAVGC) 2017-2022 introduced to address areas of skill development, infrastructure growth, ecosystem expansion, marketing support as well as financial concessions and incentives for Karnataka.
  • The policy promotes exports by attracting global production, while at the same time providing impetus to indigenous productions in terms of original IP and short films and start-ups in areas such as game development, virtual reality, augmented reality and educational technology.
  • Hosting top global events in Bengaluru. An annual calendar comprising worldclass flagship events like Bengaluru GAFX Conference, Elevate 100 and Bengaluru Tech Summit.

Shooting Locales

Bangalore

Coorg

Gangavathi

Udupi

Badami Caves

Balmuri Falls

Ramanagaram

For More Information Contact
M Ravikumar, Director, Department of Information and Public Relations Tel: 080-22028001, 080-22028002
Email: directorinformation.gov@gmail.com
State Website: http://www.karnatakatourism.org/