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Films to Watch in 2020

admin   February 21, 2020

GanguBai kathiawadi (Hindi)
Director: Sanjay leela Bhansali

The latest film from the maker of Bollywood blockbusters marks a a significant change of pace. GangubaiKathiawadi stars Alia Bhatt as a woman who lives life on her own terms. The role spans several decades – the protagonist goes from being the 17-year-old Ganga, a girl from Kathiawad, Gujarat, to become the matriarch of Mumbai’s red-light district and a key figure in the city’s underworld.

Illiralare Allige Hogalare (kannada)
(Confined hither… Can’t go thither)
Director: Girish Kasaravalli

Girish Kasaravalli’s first feature since Koormavatara (2011) is an adaptation of a short story by Kannada writer Jayant Kaikini. The story, written in the early 1990s, revolves around an 11-year-old village boy who is employed by a family in Mumbai to look after their child. The celebrated auteur’s 15th feature probes the rural-urban divide, the dynamics of class and the dilemmas of childhood.

Laal Singh Chaddha (Hindi)
Director: Advait Chandan

Aamir Khan plays the titular role in Laal Singh Chaddha, an official remake of the Tom Hanks hit of a quarter century ago, Forrest Gump. The original screenplay has been reworked for Indian audiences by stage and film actor Atul Kulkarni. The film is helmed by Advait Chandan, who made his debut with Secret Superstar, produced by Aamir. Laal Singh Chaddha, which has Kareena Kapoor and Tamil star Vijay Sethupathi in key roles, follows important events in India’s contemporary history from the standpoint of the simple-minded protagonist.

Chuzhali (Malayalam)
Director: Lijo Jose Pellissery

Even as his Jallikattu premiered in the Toronto International Film Festival in September, Lijo Jose Pellissery, one of Kerala’s most exciting contemporary filmmakers, was shooting his next. The cast of the new film, titled Chuzhali, includes Joju George, Chemban Vinod Jose, Vinay Forrt and DileeshPothan. By the time the crime thriller is ready to travel, the prolific director will probably be in the midst of Disco, to be filmed in Las Vegas.

Aquarium (Bengali)
Director: Aditya Vikram Sengupta

Aditya Vikram Sengupta’s third feature film is an Indo-French-Norwegian co-production shot by Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s cinematographer GokhanTiryaki. The director of Labour of Love and Jonaki has cast Bengali actors Sujan Mukhopadhyay, Sreelekha Mitra and BratyaBasu in the new film. Aquarium hinges on between a temperamentally mismatched married couple whose relationship unravels against the backdrop of a major financial scam that
shook Bengal recently.

Chhalaang (Hindi)
Director: Hansal Mehta

Director Hansal Mehta and actor Rajkummar Rao team up for the fifth time for this social drama about a physical training (PT) teacher in a small school in Haryana who learns the hard way to take his job seriously. Chhalaang, co-produced by Bollywood star Ajay Devgn, is in a markedly lighter zone than the intense films that the director-actor duo has delivered so far – Shahid, City Lights, Aligarh and Omerta.

Kayattam (Malayalam)
Director: Sanal kumar Sasidharan

The first production venture of actress Manju Warrier, Kayattam, Sanal Kumar Sasidharan’s sixth feature,has been wrapped up after an eventful shoot in the upper reaches of Himachal Pradesh. The crew of the film, including the director and the actress-producer, were stranded for several days in a remote location due to heavy rain and snowfall. A special rescue operation had to be mounted to get them out of there.Sasidharan’s previous film, Chola, was in the Orrizonti competition in Venice last year.

Angrezi Medium (Hindi)
Director: Homi Adajania

A follow-up to the 2017 social comedy Hindi Medium, Angrezi Medium, directed by Homi Adajania (Being Cyrus, Finding Fanny), features Irrfan Khan in the lead role. The cast of the film includes Kareena Kapoor Khan, Radhika Madan (Mard Ko Dard Nahi Hota) and Dimple Kapadia. Scheduled for release in the third week of March, Angrezi Medium is one of the year’s most anticipated films because it is Irrfan’s first outing after his hospitalization.


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Seven Indian Indie Filmmakers To Watch

admin   August 30, 2019

Fabulous & Fantastic

Aamis (Ravening)

Assamese writer-director Bhaskar Hazarika is a cinematic fabulist whose sensibility is anything but ordinary. His two films, Kothanodi (River of Fables) and Aamis (Ravening), foray into zones of consciousness that border on the bizarre (in the case of the former) and the macabre (in the latter) even as they remain unwaveringly humanistic.

Bhaskar Hazarika

Kothanodi drew upon a compendium of Assamese folk tales to narrate four stories blending the fabulous and the fantastic to throw light on the human condition. The film had its world premiere in Busan. Aamis, the story of a young man drawn towards an older woman via their love for meats of all kinds – a forbidden relationship that triggers a chain of acts of self-destruction. The Aamis premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Distinctive Approach

Khanaur (Bitter Chestnut)

Only two narrative features old, Gurvinder Singh, a filmmaker with a distinctive approach to the medium, is already close to achieving the status of a master. His first film, Anhe Ghore Da Daan (Alms for a Blind Horse, 2011), premiered in Venice. His second, Chauthi Koot (The Fourth Direction), made it to the Cannes Film Festival’s Un Certain Regard competition.

Gurvinder Singh

The two Punjabi-language films, adapted from literature, were richly textured, quietly engaging portraits of common people dealing with socio-political and historical forces beyond their control. The Mani Kaul protégé has been running a café in the tiny town of Bir, Himachal Pradesh for several years. His next film, Khanaur (Bitter Chestnut), which is expected to premiere in one of the major festivals later this year, is a personal “insider’s take” on the lives of the ordinary folks of a place in flux owing to its transformation into a paragliding hub.

Going Beyond Stories

Chola

Half a decade is all that the 42-year-old lawyer-turned-filmmaker has taken to carve a niche for himself. Sanal Kumar Sasidharan’s combative films, which have fetched him numerous international and state awards since his first feature, the crowd-funded Oralpokkam (Six Feet High, 2014), go beyond mere stories. They engage at a very deep level with contemporary social and political issues.

Sanal Kumar Sasidharan

Chola, his fifth feature and the sole Indian film in the official line up of the 76th Venice International Film Festival, is no different. It expands upon his concern with individuals dealing with collective attitudes and prejudices in a complex society. It, however, represents a break from his previous four films. Chola is two hours long – the longest of Sasidharan’s films thus far – and features mainstream Malayalam cinema stars, Nimisha Sajayan and Joju George, both of whom picked up acting prizes in the 2019 Kerala State Film Awards. Sasidharan’s S Durga won the Hivos Tiger Award at the International Film Festival of Rotterdam in 2017.

Capable Talent

A Death in the Gunj

Actress-filmmaker Konkona Sen Sharma has yet to chalk out plans for her sophomore directorial outing, she is one talent capable of springing surprises both behind and in front of the camera. Her maiden film, A Death in the Gunj, as fine a film as any Indian first-timer has ever made, premiered in TIFF in 2016.

Konkona Sen Sharma

One of her earliest films as an actor, Shonali Bose’s Amu, in which she played the titular role, also screened in Toronto. She is currently prepping for a web series that she is slated to direct on the life and times of Arati Das, who was known as Kolkata’s queen of cabaret in her heydays. The show will be set against the social and political backdrop of 1960s and 1970s Bengal. The series is expected to go on the floors early next year. That rules out the likelihood of Sen Sharma delivering a new big screen film in 2020. She is nonetheless one Indian filmmaker whose progress as a director will be followed with keen interest.

Strong Cinematic Sense

Iewduh

The world is likely to soon hear a great deal more of the maverick Meghalaya filmmaker Pradip Kurbah. A two-time National Award-winner, he is all set to catapult his native language, Khasi, on to the global cinema stage. His third narrative feature, Iewduh, set in the entrails of the largest market in the northeastern hill state and filmed with sync sound, is due to emerge in a major international festival soon. Kurbah’s first two films, RI: Homeland of Uncertainty and Onaatah: Daughter of the Earth, fetched him unstinted awards and accolades.

Pradip Kurbah

Amrit Pritam, who works closely with Oscar-winner ResulPookutty, is the sound designer of the film. A director rooted in his milieu and endowed with a strong cinematic sense, he has already earned a fan following in his home state and other parts of India. Iewduh, which promises to be the next big leap in his career, could be the beginning of a new chapter.

Worldwide Waves

Ma’ama (Moan)

An alumnus of the Kolkata-based Satyajit Ray Film and Tele­vision Institute, Dominic Sangma, who makes films in the Garo language, is another Meghalaya filmmaker who has begun to make waves worldwide. His debut feature, Ma’ama (Moan), a deeply personal film that probes loss and longing from the standpoint of an old man – the director’s father – grieving for his long-deceased wife, instantly marked him out as a storyteller of exceptional depth.

Dominic Sangma

Ma’ama was the only Indian film to earn a slot in the International Competition of the 2018 Jio MAMI Film Festival. Sangma’s second film, Rapture, was one of ten projects from across the world select­ed for mentoring by filmmaker Mira Nair in the La Fabrique Cinemaprogramme hosted by InstitutFrancais as a part of the 2019 Cannes Film Festival.

Striking Voice

Super Deluxe

A Tamil filmmaker waiting to be discovered by the world, Thiagarajan Kumararaja’s two films – the neo-noir gangster film Aaranya Kaandam (2011) and the multi-plot drama Super Deluxe (2019) – have established him as one of the most strikingly voices working in Chennai today.

Thiagarajan Kumararaja

Aaranya Kaandam was in the making for several years, ran into trouble with India’s censor board and eventually under performed at the box office. But the film’s appeal has grown steadily – it now enjoys cult status. Kumararaja’s second film, Super Deluxe, proved beyond doubt that here was a fearless filmmaker capable of weaving pure magic with ideas, plot twists and images. The film orchestrates its multiple strands with awe-inspiring skill and an unfailing sense of drama that draws its strength from being both provocative and entertaining.


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Indie Resurgence

admin   August 29, 2019

Driven by a fresh burst of energy, a new breed of independent filmmakers are delivering films based on their own individualistic visions, erasing the gap between the socially meaningful and the commercially viable Indian cinema – By Saibal Chatterjee

Mediocrity is mainstream Indian cinema’s comfort zone. It has always been. But today, being middling is more than just an old habit for filmmakers seeking easy ways to achieve runaway commercial success. It has become a necessity. Low-grade, star-driven commercial cinema and its purveyors are being gleefully embraced by both the masses and the official agencies charged with the promotion of film culture in the country.

It is hardly surprising, therefore, that an unabashedly misogynistic film like
Arjun Reddy hits the box-office bull’s eye. Its Hindi remake, Kabir Singh, made by the same director with a different actor, does even better.

Another easy-to-sell category of cinema has emerged, especially in Mumbai, over the past few years: adulatory biopics and puff jobs. These are films that are either aggressively jingoistic (Uri: The Surgical Strike, RAW: Romeo Akbar Walter) or are unabashed extended, fictionalized public service adverts (Toilet: Ek Prem Katha). Taking the line of least resistance pays instant dividends. These films not only make pots of money but also often go on to win national awards at the cost of essays that are leagues ahead in cinematic terms.

But for a new breed of independent filmmakers who are consciously pulling away from the crowd and following their own individualistic visions to deliver films aimed at erasing the gap between the socially meaningful and the commercially viable, Indian cinema today would have worn the looks of a hopeless wasteland.

Mercifully, even filmmakers working in the mainstream space – Pa. Ranjith and Vetrimaaran in Chennai and Anurag Kashyap and Anubhav Sinha in Mumbai – do not shy away from hitting political hot-buttons and questioning gender presumptions in stories couched in popular narrative formulations.

When Vetrimaaran makes Vada Chennai, he ensures that it isn’t any ordinary gangster flick. He infuses it with a social resonance that communicates truths about a city and society in ways that are beyond the reach of less clued-in filmmakers. Pretty much the same is true of Pa. Ranjith. His two Rajinikanth vehicles, Kabali and Kaala, have a strong caste struggle sub-text delivered in a style that never strays into the preachy and boring. Ranjith also recently produced Mari Selvaraj’s Pariyerum Perumal, the story of a boy from an oppressed caste struggling to ward of continuing discrimination.

Ranjith is now in the midst of directing his first Hindi-language film – a drama based on the life of tribal freedom fighter Birsa Munda. The choice of hero is a natural progression for a filmmaker whose cinema has probed the place of the deprived and dispossessed in a society where power flows from religious identity and caste allegiance.

Important elements dovetailed into the plot of Anurag Kashyap’s boxing drama Mukkabaaz also reflects the political consciousness of the maker. The ills of the caste system have also been laid bare in stark detail in Anubhav Sinha’s Article 15. The film is a worthy follow-up to Sinha’s Mulk, which addressed the issue of Islamophobia head-on. We might argue that Indian films still haven’t gone far enough to call out patriarchy and the Brahmanical order. But the very fact that some films are making an attempt, no matter a feeble, is itself a sign of the changing times.

A fresh burst of energy is driving independent filmmakers not just in Tamil
Nadu and Kerala but also in Mumbai. The primary space in debutant Madhu C. Narayanan’s Malayalam film Kumbalangi Nights, scripted by Syam Puskaran, is the home of four brothers who have no woman in their lives. The siblings are all flawed, scalded individuals until women enter their lives and make them see life and love in a different light. The film is an examination of masculinity that turns the entire notion of patriarchy on its head.

Thiagarajan Kumararaja’s daringly innovative multi-plot drama Super Deluxe is a film that throws caution to the wind and yet comes with such astounding formal precision that one cannot but watch in awe and applaud. Kumararaja throws four sub-plots into a giant, constantly whirring grinder and emerges with a film so fascinating and so wondrously inventive that one is caught by surprise at every turn.

Super Deluxe subverts our expectations at every turn. A couple is thrown into turmoil following the death of the woman’s ex-boyfriend in her bed. A father of a boy returns to his family after a seven-year absence in the guise of a transwoman. A schoolboy who bunks school with his friends to watch a pornographic film flies into a rage on discovering that his mother is an adult movie actress. Four friends get into terrible tangle with the underworld in an attempt to wriggle out of a minor jam.

The fast-paced, almost breathless film delivers a dazzling kaleidoscope of an urban landscape where every single day is as strange and disconcerting as the previous one. Super Deluxe is testimony to what younger Tamil filmmakers are capable of as storytellers and craftsmen.

The new Malayalam cinema, too, is going through a wonderfully fecund phase. Three films made by Kerala directors are in two of world’s major festivals this year. Sanal Kumar Sasidharan’s Chola (Shape of Water) premieres at the Venice Film Festival while Lijo Jose Pellissery’s Jallikattu and Getu Mohandas’s Moothon are in the Toronto International Film Festival. Sasidharan’s S Durga won the Hivos Tiger Award at the International Film Festival of Rotterdam a couple of years ago, the first Indian film to bag the prize.

Lijo is, of course, also a name to reckon with. He is in the midst of a urple patch., Before Jallikattu, he delivered two absolutely stunning films – Angamaly Diaries and Ee. Ma. Yau – both of which prove his grasp over the medium and his phenomenal ability to handle a multiplicity of actors within single uninterrupted sequences.

The first world that spring to mind when watching a Lijo film is dynamism, the kind that can be extremely infectious. It would be no exaggeration if we were to suggest that he, along with Sasidharan, are the ones who are propelling the resurgence of Malayalam cinema on the global stage. We expect more surprises as filmmakers from Kerala reclaim the place they had in international festivals in the 1980s and a part of the 1990s.