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NFDC Film Bazaar’s Co-Production Projects at Cannes Film Market

admin   July 5, 2021

Film Bazaar, South Asia’s largest co-production market, has collaborated with the Cannes Film Market to present seven projects looking for co-producers and financiers on July 9. Co-Production Day will give the selected participants the opportunity to connect and do one-on-one online meetings with co-producers and financiers at Marché du Film.

The seven projects are Dengue by Prantik Basu (India, Netherlands), Rasa (Immerse) by Anjali Menon (India), Kuhiro Pariko Sahar (A Hidden Tale Behind The Mist) by Pasang Dawa Sherpa (Nepal), Moving Bangladesh by Nuhash Humayun (Bangladesh), Last Time On Earth by Paromita Dhar (India, France), Ghol (The Catch) by Rishi Chandna and Second Chance by Subhadra Mahajan (India).

1. Dengue (India, Netherlands | Bengali, Hindi, English)

Director – PrantikBasu

Producers – Prantik Basu, Jan van der Zanden

Dengue

During a sudden summer rain in Kolkata (India), a young migrant worker named Nepal gives refuge to Sunny, a medical student, by offering him his room to stay. While the narrow suburban roads get flooded and soon become a breeding ground for mosquitoes that carry a tropical virus, a feverish romance unfolds between the two men.

2. Rasa (Immerse) (India | Malayalam, Hindi, English, Tamil)

Director – Anjali Menon

Producers – Anjali Menon, NP Prakash

Rasa (Immerse)

Manju, 34, a Nepali maid in a South Indian household, wears an emotionless face of efficient servitude. But this mask crumbles when she comes across Bharatanatyam, an Indian classical dance. Lavanya, 14, the school going daughter of Manju’s boss, has to train for a classical dance contest. A reluctant Manju escorts her but unexpectedly the dance surprises her with itsgrace and emotion. Falling desperately in love with the dance form, Manju meticulously supports Lavanya’s dance training and performance; caring and paying attention to every minute detail.

3. KuhiroPariko Sahar (A Hidden Tale behind the Mist) (Nepal | Nepali)

Director – PasangDawa Sherpa

Producers – Prem Prasad Adhikary

KuhiroPariko Sahar (A Hidden Tale behind the Mist)

A devoted wife, SARKI (21) lives with her stony-hearted husband SANGE (28) and son DORJE (7) in a village surrounded by beautiful mountains. Sarki’s daily routine consists of household chores along with taking care of her paralyzed husband. Her efforts do not pay off and his health is worsening gradually. All of sudden their dog dies in a mysterious way. Sarki believes that it took all her husband’s pain and passed away. When Sange gets recovered but she gets encountered with a different reality.

4. Moving Bangladesh (Bangladesh, France | Bengali)

Director – NuhashHumayun

Producers – BijonImtiaz, Arifur Rahman, Bich-Quan Tran

 Moving Bangladesh

Sick of being stuck in traffic and in life, a struggling entrepreneur creates a motorbike-based ride-sharing app that may change travel in Bangladesh, forever… if he can overcome his family, relationships- and the government.

5. Last Time On Earth (India, France),

Director –ParomitaDhar

Producers – ParomitaDhar, YohannCornu

Last Time On Earth

Last Time on Earth is the story of Manna and his persistent dream of magical proportions. He is a construction worker who left his village to work in the city. While he toils in the night time metropolis, his dreams literally day time dreams seeping into scattered sleep take him repeatedly to the moon. Manna works in its glow and has recurring dreams of it. They are dreams that metamorphosis into signs, and finally into an idea that he plans to execute with his friend Kazi’s help.

6. Ghol (The Catch) (India | Gujarati, Hindi, English)

Director – Rishi Chandna

Producer – Dina Dattani

Ghol (The Catch)

An impoverished Muslim fisherman becomes a millionaire overnight after catching a shoal of the rare and prized Ghol fish in the polluted, nearly barren waters off the west coast of India. The newfound wealth offers him a chance to buy a bigger boat and rebuild his life, but a renewed wave of anti-Muslim sentiment threatens his plans and forces him to confront past traumas.

7. Second Chance by Subhadra Mahajan (India)

Director – Subhadra Mahajan

Producers – Shyam Bora, Bhaskar Hazarika

Second Chance by Subhadra Mahajan

City girl Mia visits her family home in the Himalayas in winter, alone; depressed & detached. The caretaker of the house departs, leaving his old mother-in-law Bimal, in charge. Her days are filled with manual labor & looking after her naughty grandson Sunny. Interaction is unavoidable… The 3 distinct souls find themselves bound together beyond age & class divides. Until the arrival of an unexpected visitor drives Mia straight back into her trauma. Mia debates giving herself a ‘Second Chance’.


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Get Your Film Take Wings at Virtual Film Bazaar

admin   September 14, 2020

National Film Development Corporation’s Film Bazaar has created a climate in which young filmmakers can dare to attempt transcending geographical boundaries.

As an incubator of new film projects in India and the rest of the subcontinent, the NFDC Film Bazar Goa, now in its 14th year, has rendered yeoman service by engendering an eco-system that allows originality to thrive while not losing sight of tried and tested ground rules that have proven beneficial. This year Film Bazaar will take place in virtual format.

It isn’t surprising, therefore, that many of the subcontinent’s most applauded and well-travelled contemporary films have taken shape – and wings – on this platform that has made mentoring and networking facilities available to them. Think Ritesh Batra’s The Lunchbox, Chaitanya Tamhane’s Court, Paobam Paban Kumar’s Loktak Lairembee and Ashim Ahluwalia’s Miss Lovely and you cannot help but recognise the assistance that these acclaimed Indian films have received at the Film Bazaar where buyers, sellers, festival programmers and producers converge in search of the next lot of support-worthy films.

It isn’t unusual for veteran screenwriters and directors (such as Govind Nihalani and Kamal Swaroop) to turn up in this dynamic marketplace with the intention of exploring co-production possibilities. The Bazaar is numerically dominated by younger filmmakers, a large percentage of them being first-timers.

Film Bazaar Goa is held on the sidelines of the International Film Festival of India (IFFI), but it is a hub of activity so intense that it often overshadows the main event. The greatest strength of the Bazaar is the youthful energy that propels it and the range and depth of international participation that the annual event commands. The result is a space where a free exchange of ideas and synergies take place and yields salutary results.

Filmmakers from across the subcontinent have benefitted immensely from the time and energy they have spent in Goa in reaching out to the world and pushing their ideas, films and screenplays. A majority of Indian films that have played in the leading international festivals – The Lunchbox, Miss Lovely, Titli, Chauthi Koot, Thithi, Killa and Ship of Theseus, to name only a few – have participated in Film Bazaar at crucial stages of their development.

Assamese director Bhaskar Hazarika’s Aamis (Ravening) was part of the Film Bazaar’s Co-Production Market in 2017. It returned to the Viewing Room – Film Bazaar Recommends in 2018 and went on to screen in the Tribeca Film Festival in 2019. Geetu Mohandas’ Moothon (The Elder One), which had its world premiere at the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) in September, opened in Indian multiplexes in the second week of November.

The film had started its journey in Film Bazaar’s Co-Production Market in 2016 (the title back then was Insha’allah). Moothon was in the Work-in-Progress (WIP) Lab the very next year alongside several other Indian films that got picked by international festivals – Ere Gowda’s Balekempa, Dominic Sangma’s Garo-language Ma’Ama and Ivan Ayr’s Soni.

Geetu Mohandas, an actress-turned-filmmaker also owes the rise of her debut film, Liar’s Dice, to Film Bazaar. The film was in the Co-Production Market in 2011. It premiered in the MAMI Mumbai Film Festival in 2013 before being screened in the Sundance Film Festival and 2014. Liar’s Dice was India’s official nomination that year for the Best Foreign Language film Oscar.

Besides a host of films that have come out of the country’s many filmmaking centres, projects conceived and developed in Mumbai have enjoyed a lion’s share of the spoils in Film Bazaar. The most notable among them is The Lunchbox. After its world premiere in Cannes Critics’ Week in 2013, it travelled to TIFF and Karlovy Vary.

The Lunchbox was distributed in more 50 countries – a record for an independent Indian film. Interestingly, the Film Bazaar has over the past decade and a bit mentored films that have subsequently taken on commercial trappings and gone on a different tangent. Sharat Katariya’s Dum Laga Ke Haisha, starring Ayushmann Khurrana and Bhumi Pednekar, which came to Goa as a work in progress, went mainstream with Yash Raj Films throwing its weight behind the film.

Films such as Shanghai and Nil BatteySannat, among others, have found similar theatrical outlets. In the case of Alankrita Shrivastava’s Lipstick Under My Burkha, Prakash Jha Productions was involved from the very outset. It was part of Film Bazaar’s WIP Lab in 2015. Completed in 2016
and released in 2017 after a protracted run-in with the censors, the film earned critical accolades and substantial commercial success.

Gitanjali Rao’s animation film Bombay Rose has had the longest gestation of all the titles that have emerged from the Film Bazaar. It was in the Screenwriters’ Lab in 2015, the Co-Production Market in 2016 and the WIP Lab in 2017. In 2019, it premiered at the 76th Venice Film Festival and then travelled to TIFF, Busan International Film Festival and BFI London Film Festival. It is now scheduled to screen in the Doha Film Institute’s Ajyal Film Festival and Marrakesh International Film Festival.

Not every film that participates in the Film Bazaar soars into the stratosphere. In fact, a chunk of the entries that have been listed on the Viewing Room roster run into dead-ends. But that does not diminish the significance of the exercise. Over the last decade, almost every film that is regarded as fine specimen of Indian indie cinema – among them Nagraj Manjule’s Fandry, Rahi Anil Barve’s Tumbbad, KanuBehl’s Titli, Shanker Raman’s Gurgaon, Pushpendra Singh’s Ashwatthama, Amit V Masurkar’s Newton, Devashish Makhija’s Bhonsle, Dipesh Jain’s In the Shadows and RidhamJanve’s The Gold-Laden Sheep & the Sacred Mountain – is a Film Bazaar product. The event helps these filmmakers not only to evolve into outstanding films but also to find a place on the radar of the spotters that are sent out by major festivals.

In a nation that produces more films than any other in the world, Film Bazaar has created a climate in which young filmmakers can dare to attempt transcending geographical boundaries. The Mumbai movie industry in particular is notoriously insular and cannot see beyond box office collections. But filmmakers working outside the pale of the mainstream are compelled to think of the wider world – the Film Bazaar fulfils that needs admirably, helping independent filmmakers engage with the world on an equal footing.

One of the biggest contributions of the Film Bazaar is manifested in the support it has extended to filmmakers from other countries of the subcontinent. Bangladesh’s Mostafa Sarwar Farooki, Rubaiyat Hossain and Golam Rabbany Biplob, Sri Lanka’s Prasanna Vithanage and Prasanna Jayakody, Pakistan’s Mehreen Jabbar and Sabiha Sumar, Nepal’s Deepak Rauniyar, Bhutan’s Khyentse Norbu and Afghanistan’s Siddiq Barmak have been part of the Film Bazaar over the years.

No wonder, for indie filmmakers in this part of the world, all roads lead to Goa come November.


Italy Rolls out Red Carpet to Indian Filmmakers

admin   July 6, 2020

Italy is the partner country in the five-day eFICCI FRAMES beginning July 7. Because of the Covid pandemic Italian institutions and producers will participate virtually with Indian M&E industry professionals. Pickle chats with Roberto Stabile, Head of International Department of ANICA (Italian Film Audiovisual Multimedia Industries Association) & ITA (Italian Trade Agency) Audiovisual Desks Coordinator who has been instrumental forging new partnership between India and Italy in the audiovisual space

It is great that business is coming back and Italy is the partner country with FICCI FRAMES? What is your immediate objective?

Our objective is to get to know each other better, so that we can develop future collaborations in the audiovisual sector: we would like to set up coproductions, sell films and TV series to Indian distributors and television and bring Indian productions to Italy to highlight our beautiful territory by helping them take advantage of our fiscal incentives. Only by meeting and discussing issues as we do on
occasions such as FICCI can we understand how we can collaborate to our reciprocal satisfaction.

How did you decide to become partner country for FICCI FRAMES?

It is very important for our international relationship with India. FICCI FRAMES is the best place to start our collaboration with India and bring producers of two countries together.

What’s the current COVID scenario in Italy? We read that things are getting normal, shootings have begun and theatres opened?

We have finally started production again, but we have to respect
extremely complicated and rigid protocols, it will take some time to
bring us back up to speed. Many cinemas are still closed although they have been authorised to open again. The cost of opening the cinemas half empty to allow distancing imposed by the security measures means that they are not economically viable. People are also still very careful and don’t like the idea of sitting in closed spaces next to strangers. It is also true that after months of lockdown they want to go out, walk, meet friends more than shut themselves up to watch a film. Traditionally cinemas in Italy are empty during summer so to see the cinemas open again will have to wait for autumn.

How would you like to give shape to the India-Italy collaboration in the filmed entertainment space?

We have to make sure that our producers and authors meet and discuss ideas and allow that through this process projects are developed together so that new business will grow. It is a long but natural process which can’t be forced but helped and nurtured, with time we will have some interesting results.

Where is the India-Italy relationship at this point of time?

Politically, we have very good relationship with India. Unfortunately, we have few collaborations in the audiovisual space. So we will start from FICCI FRAMES to push our producers to know exactly what they can do
with Indian producers. And also to explain, what Italy offers in terms of ideas, projects and funds for collaboration. The best way is to connect Indian and Italian producers. We must dream together, tweet together, discuss projects and ideas (virtually for the time being)
and we will get results. Also, we want to push people doing something
because we truly believe that we can make great projects working together in the film industry.

What is it that Italy offers to Indian co-producers?

In our new law we have incentives and funding for collaboration. We offer huge support for people coming to shoot movies from India. They can come and shoot without any kind of co-production. We have opened Italian doors to Indian filmmakers.

India has signed Co-production Treaty with Italy over a decade back. Why it has not taken off ?

This is the problem of political bureaucracy in India and alo in Italy. We need to work more closer than ever before. We need to add streaming and animation in the coproduction treaty. We will have a deliberation on animation. In fact, we can begin our new collaboration with animation.

How do you like to see collaboration going forward and do you see more collboarion during IFFI and Film Bazaar 2020?

I am sure that all this could start by bringing some important Indian
productions to Italy, I think this is the first important step to take
and also the easiest. I am ready to increase our collaboration with all
the most important cinema events in India starting with those mentioned
and I would be honoured to organise a Focus dedicated to India during the next Venice Production Bridge at the Venice International Film Festival.


IFFI: The Stage is Getting Ready

admin   June 22, 2020

The preparations for 51st edition of the International Film Festival of India (IFFI) have begun in full swing. IFFI’s Golden Jubilee edition will be remembered for a long time for a string of things from honouring film industry legends Rajinikanth and Amitabh Bachchan to high profile International Jury for Competition Films.

IFFI 2020 is being planned as exciting as that of the golden jubilee edition, despite the challenges posed by the Covid-19 pandemic. It is expected to be as wide-ranging and bigger as its last year edition. IFFI 2020 will celebrate 100 years of India’s legendary filmmaker Satyajit Ray. The 9-day cinematic feast will embrace the works of a wide variety of filmmakers across the world with masterclasses, knowledge series and Film Bazaar.

IFFI is thrilled that South Korean film Parasite which had its India Premiere at IFFI Goa 2019 won Oscars for Best Picture. The film is running successfully in theatres now. IFFI is on the lookout for International Jury members for IFFI 2020 and some big names are expected to be part of it.

At the virtual Cannes Film Market, IFFI is meeting up with film executives, sales agents, festival heads to collaborate and looking at curating another edition of fabulous films from across the globe. IFFI will also have knowledge sessions, master classes and open forum besides festival films.

Asia’s oldest event of its kind, IFFI still holds on to its pre-eminent position as a showcase of cinematic excellence. It has over the years witnessed numerous alterations in character, nomenclature, location, dates and duration. Through it all, it has remained steadfast in its emphasis on showcasing the diversity of Indian cinema as well as in its commitment to the celebration of excellence across moviemaking genres.

Over the past two and a half decades, several other international film festivals have sprung up across India, notably in Kolkata, Kerala and Mumbai, and they all contribute meaningfully to the collective task of taking quality cinema to people weaned principally on a staple diet of star driven, song and dance extravaganzas. But IFFI continues to retain its pre-eminent position owing to its size, scope and vintage.

Not just in the Indian context but also in relation to the other major Asian film festivals, IFFI matters. And this is despite all the inevitable ups and downs that it has seen over the years.

All the other major Asian festivals – Tokyo, Busan and Shanghai – are of far more recent origin and therefore lack the history that is associated with IFFI. IFFI hands out prize money to the tune of US$ 200,000. The winner of the Golden Peacock for the best film takes home $80,000. That apart, the best director and the Special Jury Prize winner bag $30,000 each, while the two acting prizes come with a cash component of $20,000 each.

IFFI also confers two Lifetime 375 India’s Only Film BIZ magazine for the world http://www.pickle.co.in Achievement Awards – one to an international film personality, the other to an Indian great. The moves to push IFFI up a few notches have unfolded since the coastal state of Goa became its permanent venue in 2004. IFFI now has a far more settled feel than ever before, with each improvement in terms of infrastructure and programming initiatives adding value to both the event and the location.

On the programming side, IFFI not only unveils the best films from around the multilingual country with the aim of providing a glimpse of the sheer range and dynamism of Indian cinema, it also puts together a remarkable slate of brand new world cinema titles.

IFFI also hosts many retrospectives, tributes, master classes and special sections, which enhance the variety and depth of the event. The master classes have emerged as a highlight of the festival, especially for film school students who converge in Goa during the ten-day event.

India’s first international film festival was organized within five years of the nation attaining Independence. It was a non-competitive event held in 1952 in Bombay (Now Mumbai). A special feature of the inaugural function was the screening of the first film screened in India in 1896 by the Lumiere brothers. Frank Capra was part of the American delegation that attended the festival.

After a fortnight-long run in Bombay, the festival travelled to Calcutta (now Kolkata), Madras (now Chennai) and Delhi. The first international film festival of India is rightfully credited with triggering a burst of creativity in Indian cinema by exposing young Indian filmmakers to the best from around the world, especially to Italian neo-realism.

Six decades on, IFFI continues to provide a useful platform to young Indian filmmakers who work outside the mainstream distribution and exhibition system and in languages that do not have access to the pan-Indian market that Hindi cinema has.

The Indian Panorama, a section that is made up of both features and non-features, opens global avenues for films made by veterans and newcomers alike.

IFFI now has a permanent home in Goa. The coastal state has benefited appreciably from the shift. Its cinema has received a huge fillip in the decade and a half that Panaji has hosted IFFI. Filmmakers in the coastal state have been increasingly making their mark on the national and international stage.


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20 Work in Progress Tiltles Unveiled for Goes to Cannes

admin   May 29, 2020

The Marché du Film – Festival de Cannes has announced Goes to Cannes as an online-only edition as it teams up with four renowned international film festivals to showcase a selection of original works-in-progress titles seeking a sales agent, a distributor or a festival selection.

From 22 to 23 June, festivals will showcase a selection of feature films in post-production. These curated selections will be presented during two-hour online screenings. As a novelty this year, professionals who will attend the screenings will be able to organize meetings with project holders on the occasion of the Goes to Cannes Speed Meetings which will be held on the Marché du Film Online on the 24th of June from 9:00 to 21:00 (UTC+2).

Four film festivals will present their selection as part of the 8th edition of Goes to Cannes: Hong Kong – Asia Film Financing Forum (HAF), New Horizons International Film Festival, Thessaloniki International Film Festival and, for the first time this year, NFDC Film Bazaar.

“While film festivals around the world are going through a transformation never experienced before, we wish to rally together to bring positive change to the film industry,” said Jérôme Paillard, Executive Director of the Marché du Film. “We are proud to offer these major festivals and markets an online platform to help the filmmakers reach their audience in these unprecedented times. With Goes to Cannes, we also wish to show our appreciation for these festivals and markets for their relentless efforts to develop cinema and support creativity and I am especially happy to welcome NFDC Film Bazaar who have joined us this year.”

The Marché du Film Online will take place from June 22 to 26.

HAF GOES TO CANNES

Hong Kong – Asia Film Financing Forum (HAF) is the leading film project market in Asia. HAF welcomes both projects in-development and work-in-progress projects. Past participants include China’s Jia Zhangke; Hong Kong’s Stanley Kwan; South Korea’s Bong Joon-ho and many others. The 18th HAF will take place in Hong Kong from 27-29 August 2020.

List of Projects :

The Borderlands

Directed by: Samarth Mahajan
Produced by: Ashay Gangwar, Sunil Doshi (All Things Small)
Country of production: India

An intimate exploration of how everyday lives intertwine with borders in the Indian subcontinent.

Born to Be Second

Directed by: Jian Fan
Produced by: Richard Liang, S. Leo Chiang (FAN Film Studio)
Country of production: China

The film follows two families haunted by their painful past as they build towards an uncertain
tomorrow.

Dear immigrants: What Was Your First Meal?

Directed by: Fei Pang Wong
Produced by: Diana Cheung (Tonikaku Pictures Limited)
Country of production: Hong Kong

A documentary unveils rich tastes of memory from the first meal of new settlers and further unravels the larger historical flows of a “floating city”, Hong Kong.

Olympic Halftime

Directed by: Haruna Honcoop
Produced by: Vít Janecek (D1film)
Countries of production: Czech Republic, Greece, Slovak Republic

A film reflects on urban impacts and architecture of Olympic games. Controversial side effects of the Olympics are not consequences of the games themselves, but of mobility. Is this sustainable?

Ningdu

Directed by: Lei Lei
Produced by: Lei Lei, Isabelle Glachant (Chinese Shadows)
Countries of production: Hong Kong, Netherlands, USA

Caught between semi-gods and mass madness, in a world of propaganda images, surrealist collage and pop-art animation, the Lei’s struggle to live through China’s tumultuous movements.

THESSALONIKI INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL GOES TO CANNES

Thessaloniki International Film Festival is the leading Cinema institution in Greece. TIFF’s annual activity includes the organisation of Thessaloniki IFF and Thessaloniki Documentary Festival. In addition, TIFF runs 4 cinema screens, the Cinema Museum of Thessaloniki and the Thessaloniki Cinematheque. Thessaloniki Goes to Cannes is co-organized by TIFF and the Greek Film Center.

Greek Film Centre (GFC), is the main public institution that applies cinematographic policy in Greece. It provides funding for domestic production and international co-production and promotes Greek Cinema
domestically and internationally.Τhe Hellenic Film Commission (HFC) of GFC supports and facilitates international audiovisual productions planning to film in Greece and promotes Greek locations worldwide. GFC designates the national representative in EURIMAGES and collaborates with the European Commission in operating Creative Europe Media Desk – Greece.

List of Projects :

Green sea

Directed by: Angeliki Antoniou
Produced by: Lilette Botassi (Inkas Films), Angeliki Antoniou (Angeliki Antoniou Filmproduktion), Jost Hering (Jost Hering Filme)
Countries of production: Greece, Germany

“A life without memory is no life at all.” Luis Buñuel

Dog

Directed by: Yianna Americanou
Produced by: Monica Nicolaidou, Effie Skrobola, Vassilis Tzanidis, Giorgos Kyriakos, Costas Lambropoulos

Countries of production: Cyprus, Greece

A dog is man’s best friend – a child is a father’s property.

Esperanto

Directed by: Stratis Chatzielenoudas
Produced by: Ioanna Petinaraki
Country of production: Greece

The intimate portraits of canary breeders and their passion to train their darlings is our guide in this atmospheric film essay about communication and self-isolation.

If it’s not OK it’s not the end

Directed by: Salvador Muñoz Saiz
Produced by: Salvador Munoz Saiz
Country of production: Greece, Spain

The toughest opponent is never inside the ring.

Made in Vain

Directed by: Michael Klioumis
Produced by: Louizos Aslanidis
Country of production: Greece

Three bodybuilders are trapped in a perpetual, relentless struggle with the mirror, their insecurities, excessive vanity and narcissism, and the pursuit of the perfect body.

NEW HORIZONS’ POLISH DAYS GOES TO CANNES

Polish Days co-organized with the Polish Film Institute is the biggest industry event in Poland, taking place during New Horizons International Film Festival in Wrocław. It consists of presentations and screenings of the latest Polish films for international industry representatives. Polish Days 2020 will be held July 27 – 29 online.

List of Projects:

Everyone Has a Summer (Każdy ma swoje lato)

Directed by: Tomasz Jurkiewicz
Produced by: Magdalena Sztorc, Przemysław Miękinia (Before My Eyes)
Country of production: Poland

Summer holidays. Rebellious Agata comes to a small town to work at a religious camp. 17-year-old Mirek falls in love with her, while his grandfather – who suffers from dementia – sees in her his long-gone lover. Mirek uses his grandfather to get closer to Agata. As they explore their
relationship, they uncover a carefully guarded family secret.

The Moths (Ćmy)

Directed by: Piotr Stasik
Produced by: Paweł Kosuń (Centrala)
Country of production: Poland

A multi-layered poetic survival story. A group of gaunted boys aged 8-15 who fled the offline camp after the educators took their computers and cut off the Internet has been found after 20 days of search. During this time, they hid in abandoned places and did not say a word to each other. One boy was missing.

Wika!

Directed by: Agnieszka Zwiefka
Produced by: Katarzyna Ślesicka, Ania Stylińska (My Way Studio), ma.ja.de/Germany, Pystymetsa/Finland, Stefilm/Italy
Country of production: Poland, Germany, Finland, Italy

Wika is the oldest DJ in Poland and probably in the world. At the age of 81 she plays for people younger than her grandchildren and refuses to simply “grow old”. But as Wika’s career develops rapidly, the body starts to remind of her limitations. “Wika!” is an intimate portrait of a woman who tries to maintain dignity and joy of life till the last day.

The Horse Tail (Koński ogon)

Directed by: Justyna Łuczaj – Salej
Produced by: Marcin Malatyński (Indeks Film Studio)
Country of production: Poland

In a town at the foot of a cliff, between a rubbish dump, barns and a forest, people form incestuous relationships and hold painful secrets. An aging prostitute comes back to town, milk streaming from her breasts. A policeman’s wife has been raped. The main suspect becomes the object of affection of the victim’s daughter. Impossible love blooms.

The Last Mission (Orzeł. Ostatni patrol)

Directed by: Jacek Bławut
Produced by: Anna Bławut Mazurkiewicz, Bartek Gliński (Aura Films)
Country of production: Poland

Year 1940. The crew of the Polish submarine struggles in the underwater darkness against all odds: attacks of the invisible enemy, claustrophobia, own fatigue, mistakes and failures.

NFDC FILM BAZAAR GOES TO CANNES

National Film Development Corporation of India organises the NFDC Film Bazaar, South Asia’s largest film market, every year in Goa, India, from November 20-24. Since its inception in 2007, independent filmmakers of the region present their projects in the Co-production Market, Work-in-Progress Lab, Industry Screenings and other sections.

List of Projects :

Two Friends (Dostojee)

Directed by: Prasun Chatterjee
Produced by: Prasun Chatterjee, Prosenjit Ranjan Nath, Soumya Mukhopadhyay, Ivy Yu-Hua Shen (Kathak Talkies)
Country of production: India

An innocent friendship between two boys crosses the barriers built by religion and society. But when they are fatefully separated, how do they face their first farewell?

Fire in the Mountains

Directed by: Ajitpal Singh
Produced by: Ajay Rai (Jar Pictures), Mauli Singh
Country of production: India

In a Himalayan village, Chandra strains herself and saves money to build a road for her handicapped son, while the husband vies for her money for a Shamanic ritual to cure the child.

Pedro

Directed by: Natesh Hegde
Produced by: Rishab Shetty (Rishab Shetty Films)
Country of production: India

A middle- aged electrician living with his mother and his brother’s family in a remote village accidentally commits a disgraceful act. The villagers’ sentiments are hurt and they react in a way that is unexpected.

Shankar’s Fairies

Directed by: Irfana Majumdar
Produced by: Nita Kumar (Nita Kumar Productions)
Country of production: India

Lucknow, India, 1962. A little girl belonging to a privileged family and a village man who is the family servant share a relationship based on imagination and stories. Underlying their innocent bond are divided worlds: city and village, master and servant, adult and child.

The Knot (Uljhan)

Directed by: Ashish Pant
Produced by: Kartikeya Singh (Route One Productions LLP)
Country of production: India

Shirish and Geeta, a middle class couple, have a car accident one night. Their differing reactions to the fallout from the accident open up fissures in their relationship and puts to test their values and beliefs.


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Film Bazaar’s Work in Progress Films from India Goes to Cannes Virtual Market

admin   May 25, 2020

“It’s good news from India,” says Jérôme Paillard, executive director of the Cannes Marché du Film. For the first time Film Bazaar’s five ‘work in progress’ films will be pitched and presented at the at the Goes to Cannes section at the virtual Cannes Film Market 2020 (June 22-26). Film Bazaar is National Film Development Corporation’s flagship market event during the International Film of India (IFFI), Goa.

The Marché du Film offers renowned festivals the possibility to showcase their selection of original work-in-progress (WIP) titles. This year at the Cannes Virutal Film Market, Goes to Cannes spotlights work-in-progress projects from NFDC Film Bazaar, HAF (Hong Kong – Asia Film Financing Forum), New Horizons International Film Festival and Thessaloniki International Film Festival. In the coming weeks, Cannes Marché du Film will announce the full program of event as well as how to access this platform.

Accreditation for the Marché du Film Online will be available for industry professionals at an early bird rate of €95 until May 29 and €195 normal rate after that including one-year subscription to Cinando, the networking platform of the market. The registration can be done at the Cannes Film Market’s official website http://www.marchedufilm.com by clicking “myaccount”.

The recorded video presentations (rough cuts) of five Indian WIP films will be pitched to global sales agents, investors, distributors and film festivals during the Cannes Virtual Film Market beginning June 22.

Film Bazaar’s 2019 WIP Lab films include Laila Aur Satt Geet (The Shepherdess And The Seven Songs) directed by Pushpendra Singh (Gojri), Pedro directed by Natesh Hegde (Kannada), Shankar’s Fairies directed by Irfana Majumdar (Hindi), Switzerland directed by Ajitpal Singh (Hindi) and Uljhan (The Knot) directed by Ashish Pant (Hindi).

Pushpendra Singh’s Laila Aur Satt Geet (The Shepherdess and the Seven Songs) was screened in the Berlinale 2020’s newly-introduced Encounters Section

Since its inception in 2008, the Film Bazaar’s Work-in-Progress Lab has moulded films, which have gone on to premiere at top international film festivals and receive critical acclaim. Some of the past projects of this Lab include Eeb Allay Ooo! (2018), Aise Hee (2018), Nimtoh (2018), Soni (2017), Moothon (2017), Bombay Rose (2016), The Gold-Laden Sheep and The Sacred Mountain (2016), Lipstick Under My Burkha (2015), Thithi (2014), Titli (2013), Killa (2013), Miss Lovely (2011) and Ship of Theseus (2011).


Get your Film Take Wings at Film Bazaar -Block your date : 21st-24th November, 2020

admin   February 22, 2020

National Film Development Corporation’s Film Bazaar has created a climate in which young filmmakers can dare to attempt transcending geographical boundaries.

As an incubator of new film projects in India and the rest of the subcontinent, the NFDC Film Bazar Goa, now in its 14th year, has rendered yeoman service by engendering an ecosystem that allows originality to thrive while not losing sight of tried and tested ground rules that have proven beneficial.

It isn’t surprising, therefore, that many of the subcontinent’s most applauded and well-travelled contemporary films have taken shape – and wings – on this platform that has made mentoring and networking facilities available to them. Think Ritesh Batra’s The Lunchbox, Chaitanya Tamhane’s Court, Paobam Paban Kumar’s Loktak Lairembee and Ashim Ahluwalia’s Miss Lovely and you cannot help but recognise the assistance that these acclaimed Indian films have received at the Film Bazaar where buyers, sellers, festival programmers and producers converge in search of the next lot of supportworthy films.

It isn’t unusual for veteran screenwriters and directors (such as Govind Nihalani and Kamal Swaroop) to turn up in this dynamic marketplace with the intention of exploring coproduction possibilities, the Bazaar is numerically dominated by younger filmmakers, a large percentage of them being first-timers.

Film Bazaar Goa is held on the sidelines of the International Film Festival of India (IFFI), but it is a hub of activity so intense that it often overshadows the main event. The greatest strength of the Bazaar is the youthful energy that propels it and the range and depth of international participation that the annual event commands. The result is a space where a free exchange of ideas and synergies take place and yields salutary results.

Filmmakers from across the subcontinent have benefitted immensely from the time and energy they have spent in Goa in reaching out to the world and pushing their ideas, films and screenplays. A majority of Indian films that have played in the leading international festivals – The Lunchbox, Miss Lovely, Titli, Chauthi Koot, Thithi, Killa and Ship of Theseus, to name only a few – have participated in Film Bazaar at crucial stages of their development.

Assamese director Bhaskar Hazarika’s Aamis (Ravening) was part of the Film Bazaar’s Co-Production Market in 2017. It returned to the Viewing Room – Film Bazaar Recommends in 2018 and went on to screen in the Tribeca Film Festival in 2019.

Geetu Mohandas’ Moothon (The Elder One), which had its world premiere at the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) in September, opened in Indian multiplexes in the second week of November. The film had started its journey in Film Bazaar’s Co-Production Market in 2016 (the title back then was Insha’allah).

Moothonwas in the Work-in-Progress (WIP) Lab the very next year longside
several other Indian films that got picked by international festivals – Ere Gowda’s Balekempa, Dominic Sangma’s Garo-language Ma’Ama and Ivan Ayr’s Soni.

Mohandas, an actress-turnedfilmmaker also owes the rise of her debut film, Liar’s Dice, to Film Bazaar. The film was in the Co-Production Market in 2011. It premiered in the MAMI Mumbai Film Festival in 2013 before being screened in the Sundance Film Festival and 2014. Liar’s Dice was India’s official nomination that year for the Best Foreign Language film Oscar.

Besides a host of films that have come out of the country’s many filmmaking centres, projects conceived and developed in Mumbai have enjoyed a lion’s share of the spoils in Film Bazaar. The most notable among them is The Lunchbox. After its world premiere in Cannes Critics’ Week in 2013, it travelled to TIFF and Karlovy Vary. The Lunchbox was distributed in more 50 countries – a record for an independent Indian film.

Interestingly, the Film Bazaar has over the past decade and a bit mentored films that have subsequently taken on commercial trappingsand gone on a different tangent. SharatKatariya’s Dum Laga Ke Haisha, starring Ayushmann Khurrana and Bhumi Pednekar, which came to Goa as a work in progress, went mainstream with Yash Raj Films throwing its weight behind the film.

Films such as Shanghai and Nil BatteySannat, among others, have found similar theatrical outlets. In the case of Alankrita Shrivastava’s Lipstick Under My Burkha, Prakash Jha Productions was involved from the very outset. It was part of Film Bazaar’s WIP Lab in 2015. Completed in 2016 and released in 2017 after a protracted run-in with the censors, the film earned critical accolades and substantial commercial success.

Gitanjali Rao’s animation film Bombay Rose has had the longest gestation of all the titles that have emerged from the Film Bazaar. It was in the Screenwriters’ Lab in 2015, the Co-Production Market in 2016 and the WIP Lab in 2017. In 2019, it premiered at the 76th Venice Film Festival and then travelled to TIFF, Busan International Film Festival and BFI London Film Festival. It now scheduled to screen in the Doha Film Institute’s Ajyal Film Festival and Marrakesh International Film Festival.

Not every film that participates in the Film Bazaar soars into the stratosphere. In fact, a chunk of the entries that have been listed on the Viewing Room roster run into dead-ends. But that does not diminish the significance of the exercise. Over the last decade, almost every film that is regarded as fine specimen of Indian indie cinema – among them Nagraj Manjule’sFandry, Rahi Anil Barve’sTumbbad, KanuBehl’sTitli, Shanker Raman’s Gurgaon,Pushpendra Singh’s Ashwatthama, Amit V. Masurkar’s Newton, Devashish Makhija’sBhonsle, Dipesh Jain’s In the Shadows and RidhamJanve’s The Gold-Laden Sheep & the Sacred Mountain – is a Film Bazaar product. The event helps these filmmakers not only to evolve into outstanding films but also to find a place on the radar of the spotters that are sent out by major festivals.

In a nation that produces more films than any other in the world, Film Bazaar has created a climate in which young filmmakers can dare to attempt transcending geographical boundaries. The Mumbai movie industry in particular is notoriously insular and cannot see beyond box office collections. But filmmakers working outside the pale of the mainstream are compelled to think of the wider world – the Film Bazaar fulfils that needed admirably, helping independent filmmakers engage with the world on an equal footing.

One of the biggest contributions of the Film Bazaar is manifested in the support it has extended to filmmakers from other countries of the subcontinent. Bangladesh’s Mostafa Sarwar Farooki, Rubaiyat Hossain and Golam RabbanyBiplob, Sri Lanka’s Prasanna Vithanage and Prasanna Jayakody, Pakistan’s Mehreen Jabbar and SabihaSumar, Nepal’s Deepak Rauniyar, Bhutan’s KhyentseNorbu and Afghanistan’s Siddiq Barmak have been part of the Film Bazaar over the years.


Plenty in Store in 2020

admin   February 22, 2020

IFFI is thrilled that Bong Joon-ho’s South Korean film Parasite, which had its India Premiere at IFFI Goa 2019, won multiple Oscars for Best Picture, screenplay and director. Now, IFFI is scouting for films from masters of the craft at Berlinale

The preparations for 51st edition of the International Film Festival of India (IFFI) have begun in full swing. IFFI’s Golden Jubilee edition will be remembered for a long time for a string of things- from honouring film industry legends Rajinikanth to Amitabh Bachchan and high profile International Jury for Competition Films.

The India delegation at the ongoing 70th Berlin International Film festival is led by Ms. TCA Kalyani, Joint Secretary, Ministry of Information & Broadcasting and other senior members. Chaitanya Prasad, IFFI festival director is also at Berlinale 2020 to find films, collaborate with festival heads and extend invitation to filmmakers and industry professionals to attend IFFI

IFFI 2020 is being planned as exciting as that of the Golden Jubilee Edition. It will be as wide-ranging and bigger as its last year edition. IFFI 2020 will celebrate 100 years of India’s legendary filmmaker Satyajit Ray. The 9-day cinematic feast will embrace the works of a wide variety of filmmakers across the world with masterclasses, knowledge series and Film Bazaar.

IFFI is thrilled that Bong Joon-ho’s South Korean film Parasite which had its India Premiere at IFFI Goa 2019 won multiple Oscars for Best Picture, screenplay, director.

At Berlinale, IFFI is meeting up with film executives, sales agents, festival heads to collaborate and looking at curating another edition of fabulous films from across the globe. IFFI will also have knowledge sessions, master classes and open forum besides festival films. Asia’s oldest event of its kind, IFFI still holds on to its preeminent position as a showcase of cinematic excellence. It has over the years witnessed numerous alterations in character, nomenclature, location, dates and duration. Through it all, it has remained steadfast in its emphasis on showcasing the diversity of Indian cinema as well as in its commitment to the celebration of excellence across moviemaking genres.

Over the past two and a half decades, several other international film festivals have sprung up across India, notably in Kolkata, Kerala and Mumbai, and they all contribute meaningfully to the collective task of taking quality cinema to people weaned principally on a staple diet of star-driven, song and dance extravaganzas. But IFFI continues to retain its preeminent position owing to its size, scope and vintage.

Not just in the Indian context but also in relation to the other major Asian film festivals, IFFI matters. And this is despite all the inevitable ups and downs that it has seen over the years.

All the other major Asian festivals – Tokyo, Busan and Shanghai – are of far more recent origin and therefore lack the history that is associated with IFFI. IFFI hands out prize money to the tune of US$ 200,000. The winner of the Golden Peacock for the best film takes home $80,000. That apart, the best director and the Special Jury Prize winner bag $30,000 each, while the two acting prizes come with a cash component of $20,000 each.

IFFI also confers two Lifetime Achievement Awards – one to an international film personality, the other to an Indian great. The moves to push IFFI up a few notches have unfolded since the coastal state of Goa became its permanent venue in 2004. IFFI now has a far more settled feel than ever before, with each improvement in terms of infrastructure and programming initiatives adding value to both the event and the location.

On the programming side, IFFI not only unveils the best films from around the multilingual country with the aim of providing a glimpse of the sheer range and dynamism of Indian cinema, it also puts together a remarkable slate of brand new world cinema titles.

IFFI also hosts many retrospectives, tributes, master classes and special sections, which enhance the variety and depth of the event. The master classes have emerged as a highlight of the festival, especially for film school students who converge in Goa during the ten-day event.

India’s first international film festival was organized within five years of the nation attaining Independence. It was a non-competitive event held in 1952 in Bombay (Now Mumbai). A special feature of the inaugural function was the screening of the first film screened in India in 1896 by the Lumiere brothers. Frank Capra was part of the American delegation that attended the festival.

Six decades on, IFFI continues to provide a useful platform to young Indian filmmakers who work outside the mainstream distribution and exhibition system and in languages that do not have access to the pan-Indian market that Hindi cinema has.

The Indian Panorama, a section that is made up of both features and nonfeatures, opens global avenues for films made by veterans and newcomers alike.

IFFI now has a permanent home in Goa. The coastal state has benefitted appreciably from the shift. Its cinema has received a huge fillip in the decade and a half that Panaji has hosted IFFI. Filmmakers in the coastal state have been increasingly making their mark on the national and international stage.


A BOOSTER SHOT

admin   November 28, 2019

The greatest strength of the Film Bazaar, now in its 13th edition, is that it serves as a platform where there is a constant churning of ideas happening, which serves as a booster dose for filmmakers to grasp the nitty-gritty of an evolving world cinema and develop synergies through free exchange of ideas By Saibal Chatterjee

In a globalised world, the value of socio-cultural rootedness is of utmost importance. But nowhere more so than in cinema, where market forces tend to impose saleable and proven templates on individual stories and styles. Nothing could be more counter-productive. Film funds and script labs must necessarily guard against straitjacketing of the medium so that fresh voices bursting through the system and keen to be heard above the din are not forced to fall in line and follow established practice.

THE FILM BAZAAR IS NUMERICALLY DOMINATED BY YOUNGER FILMMAKERS, A LARGE PERCENTAGE OF THEM BEING FIRST TIMERS

As an incubator of new film projects in India and the rest of the subcontinent, the NFDC Film Bazaar, now in its 13th year, has rendered yeoman service by engendering an eco-system that allows originality to thrive while not losing sight of tried and tested ground rules that have proven beneficial.

It isn’t surprising, therefore, that many of the subcontinent’s most applauded and well-travelled contemporary films have taken shape – and wings – on this platform that has made mentoring and networking facilities available to them. Think Ritesh Batra’s The Lunchbox, Chaitanya Tamhane’s Court, Paobam Paban Kumar’s Loktak Lairem bee and Ashim Ahluwalia’s Miss Lovely and you cannot help but recognise the assistance that these acclaimed Indian films have received at the Film Bazaar where buyers, sellers, festival programmers and producers converge in search of the next
lot of support-worthy films.

It isn’t unusual for veteran screenwriters and directors (such as Govind Nihalani and Kamal Swaroop) to turn up in this dynamic marketplace with the intention of exploring co-production possibilities, the Bazaar is numerically dominated by younger filmmakers, a large percentage of them being first-timers.

Film Bazaar is held on the sidelines of the International Film Festival of India (IFFI), but it is a hub of activity so intense that it often overshadows the main event. The greatest strength of the Bazaar is the youthful energy that propels it and the range and depth of international participation that the annual event commands. The result is a space where a free exchange of ideas and synergies take place and yields salutary results.

Filmmakers from across the subcontinent have benefitted immensely from the time and energy they have spent in Goa in reaching out to the world and pushing their ideas, films and screenplays. A majority of Indian films that have played in the leading international festivals – The Lunchbox, Miss Lovely, Titli, Chauthi Koot, Thithi, Killa and Ship of Theseus, to name only a few – have participated in Film Bazaar at crucial stages of their development.

Assamese director Bhaskar Hazarika’s Aamis (Ravening), which coincidentally will go into theatrical distribution across the country on the third day of the 50th edition of IFFI, was part of the Film Bazaar’s Co-Production Market in 2017. It returned to the Viewing Room – Film Bazaar Recommends in 2018 and went on to screen in the Tribeca Film Festival in 2019.

Geetu Mohandas’ Moothon (The Elder One), which had its world premiere at the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) in September, opened in Indian multiplexes in the second week of November. The film had started its journey in Film Bazaar’s Co-Production Market in 2016 (the title back then was Insha’allah).

Moothon was in the Work-in-Progress (WIP) Lab the very next year alongside several other Indian films that got picked by international festivals – Ere Gowda’s Balekempa, Dominic Sangma’s Garo-language Ma’Ama and Ivan Ayr’s Soni.

Mohandas, an actress-turned-filmmaker also owes the rise of her debut film, Liar’s Dice, to Film Bazaar. The film was in the Co-Production Market in 2011. It premiered in the MAMI Mumbai Film Festival in 2013 before being screened in the Sundance Film Festival and 2014. Liar’s Dice was India’s official nomination that year for the Best Foreign Language film Oscar.

Besides a host of films that have come out of the country’s many filmmaking centres, projects conceived and developed in Mumbai have enjoyed a lion’s share of the spoils in Film Bazaar.

THE LUNCHBOX WAS CONCEIVED AND DEVELOPED AT THE FILM BAZAAR. AFTER ITS WORLD PREMIERE IN CANNES CRITICS’ WEEK IN 2013, IT TRAVELLED TO TIFF AND KARLOVY VARY. THE LUNCHBOX WAS DISTRIBUTED IN MORE 50 COUNTRIES – A RECORD FOR AN INDEPENDENT INDIAN FILM

The most notable among them is The Lunchbox. After its world premiere in Cannes Critics’ Week in 2013, it travelled to TIFF and Karlovy Vary. The Lunchbox was distributed in more 50 countries – a record for an independent Indian film.

Ashim Ahluwalia’s Miss Lovely, set in Mumbai’s sexploitation movie industry of the 1980s, was part of the Film Bazaar Works-in-Progress lab in 2011, premiered in Cannes Un Certain Regard in 2012. The film won the Golden Gateway Award of the Mumbai Film Festival and was also in the official selection of TIFF and the International Film Festival of Rotterdam (IFFR).

ASHIM AHLUWALIA’S MISS LOVELY (FILM BAZAAR WORK IN PROGRESS, PREMIERED IN CANNES UN CERTAIN REGARD) DID NOT, HOWEVER, MAKE IT TO THE INDIAN PANORAMA – A SIGN OF THE GROWING DISCONNECTION BETWEEN THE GLOBAL APPETITE FOR CINEMA THAT BREAKS THE RULES AND THE DOMESTIC TENDENCY TO STILL JUDGE CINEMA BY CONVENTIONAL YARDSTICKS

Miss Lovely did not, however, make it to the Indian Panorama – a sign of the growing disconnection between the global appetite for cinema that breaks the rules and the domestic tendency to still judge cinema by conventional yardsticks. The constant churn of ideas that takes place in the Film Bazaar is a huge advantage for filmmakers who pass through the process – they are aided in the process of grasping the directions of world cinema and acknowledging and the need to eschew old habits.

Interestingly, the Film Bazaar has over the past decade and a bit mentored films that have subsequently taken on commercial trappings and gone on a different tangent. Sharat Katariya’s Dum Laga Ke Haisha, starring Ayushmann Khurrana and Bhumi Pednekar, which came to Goa as a work in progress, went mainstream with Yash Raj Films throwing its weight behind the film.

Films such as Shanghai and Nil Battey Sannat, among others, have found similar theatrical outlets. In the case of Alankrita Shrivastava’s Lipstick Under My Burkha, Prakash Jha Productions was involved from the very outset. It was part of Film Bazaar’s WIP Lab in 2015. Completed in 2016 and released in 2017 after a protracted run-in with the censors, the film earned critical accolades and substantial commercial success.

Gitanjali Rao’s animation film Bombay Rose has had the longest gestation of all the titles that have emerged from the Film Bazaar. It was in the Screenwriters’ Lab in 2015, Co-Production Market in 2016 and the WIP Lab in 2017. In 2019, it premiered at the 76th Venice Film Festival and then travelled to TIFF, Busan International Film Festival and BFI London Film Festival. It now scheduled to screen in the Doha Film Institute’s Ajyal Film Festival and Marrakesh International Film Festival.

BOMBAY ROSE HAS HAD THE LONGEST GESTATION OF ALL THE TITLES THAT HAVE EMERGED FROM THE FILM BAZAAR. IT WAS IN THE SCREENWRITERS’ LAB IN 2015, CO-PRODUCTION MARKET IN 2016 AND THE WIP LAB IN 2017. IN 2019, IT PREMIERED AT THE 76TH VENICE FILM FESTIVAL AND THEN TRAVELLED TO TIFF, BUSAN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL AND BFI LONDON FILM FESTIVAL

Not every film that participates in the Film Bazaar soars into the stratosphere. In fact, a chunk of the entries that have been listed on the Viewing Room roster run into dead-ends. But that does not diminish the significance of the exercise. Over the last decade, almost every film that is regarded as fine specimen of Indian indie cinema – among them Nagraj Manjule’s Fandry, Rahi Anil Barve’s Tumbbad, Kanu Behl’s Titli, Shanker Raman’s Gurgaon,Pushpendra Singh’s Ashwatthama, Amit V. Masurkar’s Newton, Devashish Makhija’sBhonsle, Dipesh Jain’s In the Shadows and Ridham Janve’s The Gold-Laden Sheep & the Sacred Mountain – is a Film Bazaar product. The event helps these filmmakers not only to evolve into outstanding films but also to find a place on the radar of the spotters that are sent out by major festivals.

Two films from the 2018 Film Bazaar, Prateek Vats’ Eeb Allay Ooo! and Kislay’s Aise Hee, are proving to highly popular on the festival circuit. Eeb Allay Ooo! has won the Mumbai Film Festival’s Golden Gateway Award and premiered at the Pingyao International Film Festival. Aise Hee bowed in Busan and, like Eeb Allay Ooo!, was in the India Gold section of the Mumbai Film Festival.

THE GREATEST STRENGTH OF THE BAZAAR IS THE YOUTHFUL ENERGY THAT PROPELS IT AND THE RANGE AND DEPTH OF INTERNATIONAL PARTICIPATION THAT THE ANNUAL EVENT COMMANDS

In a nation that produces more films than any other in the world, Film Bazaar has created a climate in which young filmmakers can dare to attempt transcending geographical boundaries. The Mumbai movie industry in particular is notoriously insular and cannot see beyond box office collections. But filmmakers working outside the pale of the mainstream are compelled to think of the wider world – the Film Bazaar fulfils that needed admirably, helping independent filmmakers engage with the world on an equal footing.

One of the biggest contributions of the Film Bazaar is manifested in the support it has extended to filmmakers from other countries of the subcontinent. Bangladesh’s Mostafa Sarwar Farooki, Rubaiyat Hossain and Golam Rabbany Biplob, Sri Lanka’s Prasanna Vithanage and Prasanna Jayakody, Pakistan’s Mehreen Jabbar and Sabiha Sumar, Nepal’s Deepak Rauniyar, Bhutan’s Khyentse Norbu and Afghanistan’s Siddiq Barmak have been part of the Film Bazaar over the years.

No wonder, for indie filmmakers in this part of the world, all roads lead to Goa come November.


WONDERFUL WORK IN PROGRESS AT FILM BAZAAR 2019

admin   November 28, 2019

Out of five selected films for this year’s ‘Work in Progress’ lab, four are debut features. The director and editor of the selected film screen their rough cuts to the panel of mentors and receive an in-depth one-on-one feedback

Tedition of Film Bazaar, organised by the National Film Development Corporation (NFDC), has announces five selected projects for its Work-In- Progress Lab 2019.

OUT OF FIVE SELECTED FILMS, FOUR ARE DEBUT FEATURES – PEDRO BY NATESH HEGDE, SHANKAR’S FAIRIES BY IRFANA MAJUMDAR, SWIZERLAND BY AJITPAL SINGH AND ULJHAN BY ASHISH PANT

The selected projects include Laila Aur Satt Geet (The Shepherdess And The Seven Songs) directed by Pushpendra Singh (Gojri), Pedro directed by Natesh Hegde (Kannada), Shankar’s Fairies directed by Irfana Majumdar (Hindi), Swizerland directed by Ajitpal Singh (Hindi) and Uljhan (The Knot) directed by Ashish Pant (Hindi).

The Work-in-Progress Lab is open only for fiction features aiming for a theatrical release. A maximum of five films are selected for this Lab. The director and editor of the selected film screen their rough cuts to the pane of mentors and receive an in-depth one-on-one feedback. The international editor assigned to the film guides the director and editor of the selected film through two sessions of the editing lab, which takes place at Film Bazaar itself.

The international mentors include a film festival director, producer and film editors. They provide valuable feedback on the edit with the aim of helping the filmmaker achieve an accomplished final cut of the film.

THE MENTORS OF WIP LAB 2019 ARE PHILIPPA CAMPBELL, DEREK MALCOLM, OLIVIA STEWART, MARCO MÜLLER, JACQUES COMETS, LIZI GELBER

Since its inception in 2008, the Work-in-Progress Lab has moulded films, which have gone on to premiere at top international film festivals and receive critical acclaim.

This is the first time WIP lab projects will show their clips and pitch their films to potential investors, producers, sales agents, distributors, festival programmers in an Open Pitching session at the venue.